News you can use.

March  Newsletter

This Newsletter is full of interesting and useful information that I think you will enjoy whether you are a buyer, seller, homeowner, or renter.

This month’s issue includes topics such as:

“Make Your Home Appealing to Buyers”;
“Know Your Expenses Before You Buy”;
Home Equity Use No Longer Home Equity Abuse”;
“Get Out Of Debt”;
“Incentives for Going Green”;

Plus a roundup of February real estate activity as well as much more advice and information.

I hope you enjoy this monthly newsletter. If you have any comments, please e-mail them to me. Or, if you would like to see a certain topic covered in future months, let me know that too!

Enjoy!

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Real Estate Resolutions 2010

 

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  Sure you can lose weight, get in shape, launch a business or find a new job. But haven’t you also procrastinated long enough about buying a home?

How long has it been since you upgraded your home with a new roof, spiffed up landscaping or pulled some other home improvement?

And that post-World War II ranch home of yours could certainly use a few energy efficient do-overs.

Look to low mortgage interest rates, bargain home prices and other favorable market conditions to give you the resolve to consider home sweet home in your list of must-dos in the New Year.

  • Join the nearly 18 percent of Americans who say they’ve resolved to become a first-time homebuyer in 2010, according to a new Move.com survey. That’s both a smart move and a timely one. Mortgage rates are at record lows, prices are down and the $8,000 first-time home buyer tax credit has been extended until April 30, 2010. It’s also been expanded to include a $6,500 tax credit to move-up buyers. 
  • More than 15 percent of those who responded to the survey said saving money to purchase a new home is their top real estate resolution for the New Year. Resolve with them to learn the best way to budget, plan ahead and save money.
  • Nearly 40 percent say No. 1 on their list of resolutions is starting a home improvement project. Cheap home equity money should help them not only start, but also complete the job.
  • The Move.com survey also found 9.1 percent most wanted to fix their credit so they can buy a home next year. To get started all you need to do is take a look at your next credit card statement for a toll free number directing you to counseling help. That’s part of the new, but little-known mandated disclosure provisions in the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (CARD Act).
  • Nearly 16 percent are wisely considering buying an investment property as their top resolution. They couldn’t have picked a better time in the last half decade. Another Move.com survey recently found more than 12 percent of homebuyers today plan to purchase a home as an investment, compared to less than half, only 5.6 percent, just seven months ago, thanks to more attractive investment conditions.
  • “If you anticipate inflationary conditions in the future, investment property could be a good bet to hedge against it,” said Nancy Osborne, chief operating officer of Erate.com, a Santa Clara, CA-based financial information publisher and interest rate tracker. 
                                                                                                            Written by Broderick Perkins

No matter from which side you are looking, in 2010 is going to be THE year to invest in real estate.

Again, I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to use the services of a local Realtor®, who looks out for your interest, when purchasing a property.

Related blog article: Credit Score – How it Affects Your Buying Power

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Difference Between REO or Foreclosure Homes.

Half million dollar house in Salinas, Californ...
Image via Wikipedia

Buying bank owned properties
There is a lot of interest in buying bank owned properties these days. A lot of information, some good and some bad, is floating around about the subject.   Often the information offered is for sale, with the promise that you can make a lot of money with little effort once you know “the secret formula”.  The fact is that there are no secrets, and to make money does require effort.

What’s an REO?
REO stands for “Real Estate Owned”.  These are properties that have gone through foreclosure and are now owned by the bank or mortgage company.  This is not the same as a property up for foreclosure auction.  When buying a property during a foreclosure sale, you must pay at least the loan balance plus any interest and other fees accumulated during the foreclosure process.  You must also be prepared to pay with cash in hand.  And on top of all that, you’ll receive the property 100% “as is”.  That could include existing liens and even current occupants that need to be evicted.  A REO, by contrast, is a much “cleaner” and attractive transaction.  The REO property did not find a buyer during foreclosure auction.  The bank now owns it.  The bank will see to the removal of tax liens, evict occupants if needed and generally prepare for the issuance of a title insurance policy to the buyer at closing.  Do be aware that REO’s may be exempt from normal disclosure requirements.  In California, for example, banks are exempt from giving a Transfer Disclosure Statement, a document that normally requires sellers to tell you about any defects they are aware of.

rightIs it a bargain?
It’s commonly assumed that any REO must be a bargain and an opportunity for easy money.  This simply isn’t true.  You have to be very careful about buying a REO if your intent is to make money off of it.  While it’s true that the bank is typically anxious to sell it quickly, they are also strongly motivated to get as much as they can for it.  When considering the value of a REO, you need to look closely at comparable sales in the neighborhood and be sure to take into account the time and cost of any repairs or remodeling needed to prepare the house for resale.  The bargains with money making potential contractsigningexist, and many people do very well buying foreclosures.  But there are also many REO’s that are not good buys and not likely to turn a profit.  A realtors involvement to buy REO, or any properties for that matter, is always good advise.

 

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It’s time! So get off the fence and buy a house.

TIMEThis is what you will hear from realtors in the following weeks, all over the country:  The time to buy a house is now! 

Interest rates are at historical low levels, home prices are very affordable; it just doesn’t get any better than this.  If you were waiting for the bottom, this is it!

Please read the article below; NAR (National Association of Realtors) finally has some good news to report on the housing front: 

Big gain on existing homes sales

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Buying Foreclosures or REO’s?

rightBuying bank owned properties
There is a lot of interest in buying bank owned properties these days. A lot of information, some good and some bad, is floating around about the subject.   Often the information offered is for sale, with the promise that you can make a lot of money with little effort once you know “the secret formula”.  The fact is that there are no secrets, and to make money does require effort.

What’s an REO?left
REO stands for “Real Estate Owned”.  These are properties that have gone through foreclosure and are now owned by the bank or mortgage company.  This is not the same as a property up for foreclosure auction.  When buying a property during a foreclosure sale, you must pay at least the loan balance plus any interest and other fees accumulated during the foreclosure process.  You must also be prepared to pay with cash in hand.  And on top of all that, you’ll receive the property 100% “as is”.  That could include existing liens and even current occupants that need to be evicted. 

A REO, by contrast, is a much “cleaner” and attractive transaction.  The REO property did not find a buyer during foreclosure auction.  The bank now owns it.  The bank will see to the removal of tax liens, evict occupants if needed and generally prepare for the issuance of a title insurance policy to the buyer at closing.  Do be aware that REO’s may be exempt from normal disclosure requirements.  In California, for example, banks are exempt from giving a Transfer Disclosure Statement, a document that normally requires sellers to tell you about any defects they are aware of.

rightIs it a bargain?
It’s commonly assumed that any REO must be a bargain and an opportunity for easy money.  This simply isn’t true.  You have to be very careful about buying a REO if your intent is to make money off of it.  While it’s true that the bank is typically anxious to sell it quickly, they are also strongly motivated to get as much as they can for it.  When considering the value of a REO, you need to look closely at comparable sales in the neighborhood and be sure to take into account the time and cost of any repairs or remodeling needed to prepare the house for resale.  The bargains with money making potential exist, and many people do very well buying foreclosures.  But there are also many REO’s that are not good buys and not likely to turn a profit. 

Please check out available foreclosure homes in your area.

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